What is Bail?

What is Bail?BAIL IS YOUR CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT

Traditionally, bail is some form of property deposited or pledged to a court to persuade it to release a suspect from jail, on the understanding that the suspect will return for trial or forfeit the bail (and possibly be brought up on charges of the crime of failure to appear).

In some cases bail money may be returned at the end of the trial, if all court appearances are made, regardless of whether the person is found guilty or not guilty of the crime accused.

If a bondsman is used and a surety bond has been obtained, the fee for that bond is the fee for the insurance policy purchased and is not refundable.

How Bail Is Set?

Judges are responsible for setting bail. Because many people want to get out of jail immediately (instead of waiting for a day or longer to see a judge), most jails have standard bail schedules that specify bail amounts for common crimes.

An arrested person can often get out of jail quickly by paying the amount set forth in the stationhouse bail schedule. If a suspect wants to post bail but can’t afford the amount required by the bail schedule, the suspect can ask a judge to lower it. Depending on the state’s procedures, a request for lowered bail may be made either in a special bail setting hearing or when the suspect appears in court for the first time (usually called the arraignment). ​For more information about bail visit en.wikipedia.org/wiki/bail